Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily


07/12/2024 10:21 PM
Groundbreaking study reveals insights into Alzheimer's disease mechanisms through novel hydrogel matrix
Researchers have unveiled a pioneering study shedding light on the intricate mechanisms underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD).
07/12/2024 10:21 PM
Vivid portrait of interacting galaxies marks Webb's second anniversary
Two for two! A duo of interacting galaxies commemorates the second science anniversary of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, which takes constant observations, including images and highly detailed data known as spectra. Its operations have led to a 'parade' of discoveries by astronomers around the world.
07/12/2024 10:21 PM
When to trust an AI model
A new technique enables huge machine-learning models to efficiently generate more accurate quantifications of their uncertainty about certain predictions. This could help practitioners determine whether to trust the model when it is deployed in real-world settings.
07/12/2024 10:21 PM
How domestic rabbits become feral in the wild
After sequencing the genomes of nearly 300 rabbits from Europe, South America, and Oceania, researchers found that all of them had a mix of feral and domestic DNA. They say this was not what they had expected to find.
07/12/2024 10:21 PM
Researchers discover a new neural biomarker for OCD
A recent study has identified a specific neural activity pattern as a novel biomarker to accurately predict and monitor the clinical status of individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) who have undergone deep brain stimulation (DBS), a rapidly emerging therapeutic approach for severe psychiatric disorders.
07/12/2024 10:21 PM
2023 Rolling Hills Estates landslide likely began the winter before
Landslides triggered by intense rainfall can sometimes be predicted along with incoming storms, but dry-season landslides often take people by surprise. The July 2023 Rolling Hills Estates landslide that destroyed 12 homes seemed to come out of nowhere, but new research shows it began as early as December 2022. Researchers are developing a database that will enable scientists to plug in new data to monitor potential landslides in real time and possibly predict them.
07/12/2024 10:21 PM
Brain inflammation triggers muscle weakness after infections
Research reveals how brain inflammation triggers extreme muscle weakness across several diseases, including viral infection, bacterial infection and Alzheimer's disease. The study, in fruit flies and mice, also identified ways to block this process, which could have implications for treating or preventing the muscle wasting sometimes associated with inflammatory diseases, including bacterial infections, Alzheimer's disease and long COVID.
07/12/2024 10:21 PM
Complex impact of large wildfires on ozone layer dynamics
In a revelation highlighting the fragile balance of our planet's atmosphere, scientists have uncovered an unexpected link between massive wildfire events and the chemistry of the ozone layer. Using satellite data and numerical modeling, the team discovered that an enormous smoke-charged vortex nearly doubles the southern hemispheric aerosol burden in the middle stratosphere of the Earth and reorders ozone depletion at different heights. This study reveals how wildfires, such as the catastrophic 2019/20 Australian bushfires, impact the stratosphere in previously unseen ways.
07/12/2024 12:41 PM
Microbeads with adaptable fluorescent colors from visible light to near-infrared
Researchers have successfully developed an environmentally friendly, microspherical fluorescent material primarily made from citric acid. These microbeads emit various colors of light depending on the illuminating light and the size of the beads, which suggests a wide range of applications. Furthermore, the use of plant-derived materials allows for low-cost and energy-efficient synthesis.
07/12/2024 12:41 PM
A chemical claw machine bends and stretches when exposed to vapors
Scientists have developed a tiny 'claw machine' that is able to pick up and drop a marble-sized ball in response to exposure to chemical vapors. The findings point to a technique that can enable soft actuators--the parts of a machine that make it move--to perform multiple tasks without the need for additional costly materials. While existing soft actuators can be 'one-trick ponies' restricted to one type of movement, this novel composite film contorts itself in different ways depending on the vapor that it is exposed to.
07/12/2024 12:41 PM
New ways to study spinal cord malformations in embryos
Scientists have successfully created mechanical force sensors directly in the developing brains and spinal cords of chicken embryos, which they hope will improve understanding and prevention of birth malformations such as spina bifida.
07/12/2024 12:41 PM
High and low tide cause low and high methane fluxes
Methane, a strong greenhouse gas that naturally escapes from the bottom of the North Sea, is affected by the pressure of high or low tide. Methane emissions from the seafloor can be just easily three times as much or as little, depending on the tide, according to a new study.
07/12/2024 12:41 PM
A better way to make RNA drugs
RNA drugs are the next frontier of medicine, but manufacturing them requires an expensive and labor-intensive process that limits production and produces metric tons of toxic chemical waste. Researchers report a new, enzyme-based RNA synthesis method that can produce strands of RNA with both natural and modified nucleotides without the environmental hazards.
07/12/2024 12:41 PM
Unprecedented warming threatens Earth's lakes and their ecosystems
Lakes, with their rich biodiversity and important ecological services, face a concerning trend: rapidly increasing temperatures. A recent study by limnologists and climate modelers reveals that if current anthropogenic warming continues until the end of this century, lakes worldwide will likely experience pervasive and unprecedented surface and subsurface warming, far outside the range of what they have encountered before.
07/12/2024 12:41 PM
Insight into one of life's earliest ancestors revealed in new study
Researchers have shed light on Earth's earliest ecosystem, showing that within a few hundred million years of planetary formation, life on Earth was already flourishing.
07/12/2024 12:41 PM
Why are board games so popular among many people with autism? New research explains
Board gaming is a growing industry, and anecdotally popular among people who display autistic traits. Now new research has highlighted the science supporting the anecdote -- and the important reasons behind the link.
07/12/2024 12:41 PM
Greater attention needs to be paid to malnutrition in the sick and elderly, researchers say
As many as half of all patients admitted to hospital and other healthcare facilities are malnourished. This has serious consequences for the individual in terms of unnecessary suffering, poorer quality of life and mortality. Providing nutrients can alleviate these problems, but not enough attention is paid to this knowledge, according to researchers in a new article.
07/12/2024 12:40 PM
How plant cold specialists can adapt to the environment
Evolutionary biologists studied spoonworts to determine what influence genome duplication has on the adaptive potential of plants. The results show that polyploids -- species with more than two sets of chromosomes -- can have an accumulation of structural mutations with signals for a possible local adaptation, enabling them to occupy ecological niches time and time again.
07/12/2024 12:40 PM
Biomarkers reveal how patients with glaucoma may respond to treatment
Markers in the blood that predict whether glaucoma patients are at higher risk of continued loss of vision following conventional treatment have been identified by researchers.
07/12/2024 12:40 PM
Researchers create groundbreaking cotton quality model to aid farmers
Researchers have produced a cotton quality module -- a part of a larger forecasting tool -- allowing cotton producers to better monitor crop quality under changing environmental conditions.
07/12/2024 12:40 PM
How the 'heart and lungs' of a galaxy extend its life
Galaxies avoid an early death because they have a 'heart and lungs' which effectively regulate their 'breathing' and prevent them growing out of control, a new study suggests. If they didn't, the universe would have aged much faster than it has and all we would see today is huge 'zombie' galaxies teeming with dead and dying stars. That's according to a new study that investigates one of the great mysteries of the Universe -- why galaxies are not as large as astronomers would expect.
07/11/2024 09:56 PM
A comprehensive derivative synthesis method for development of new antimicrobial drugs
A method to screen a wide variety of drug candidates without laborious purification steps could advance the fight against drug-resistant bacteria.
07/11/2024 09:56 PM
Artificial intelligence speeds up heart scans, saving doctors' time, and could lead to better treatment for heart conditions
Researchers have developed a groundbreaking method for analysing heart MRI scans with the help of artificial intelligence, which could save valuable time and resources, as well as improve care for patients.
07/11/2024 09:56 PM
Forest carbon storage has declined across much of the Western U.S., likely due to drought and fire
Forests have been embraced as a natural climate solution, due to their ability to soak up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as they grow, locking it up in their trunks, branches, leaves, and roots. But a new study confirms widespread doubts about the potential for most forests in the Western US to help curb climate change. The paper analyzed trends in carbon storage across the American West from 2005 to 2019.
07/11/2024 09:56 PM
Charting an equitable future for DNA and ancient DNA research in Africa
The American Journal of Human Genetics recently published a perspective piece on the need for an equitable and inclusive future for DNA and ancient DNA (aDNA) research in Africa. The paper highlights the fact that, while DNA from ancient and living African peoples is increasingly critical to the study of human evolution, African scientists remain starkly underrepresented in this field.
07/11/2024 09:55 PM
Scientific definition of a planet says it must orbit our sun; A new proposal would change that
The International Astronomical Union defines a planet as a celestial body that orbits the sun, is massive enough that gravity has forced it into a spherical shape, and has cleared away other objects near its orbit around the sun. Scientists now recognize the existence of thousands of planets, but the IAU definition applies only to those within our solar system. The new proposed definition specifies that the body may orbit one or more stars, brown dwarfs or stellar remnants and sets mass limits that should apply to planets everywhere.
07/11/2024 09:55 PM
Respiratory bacteria 'turn off' immune system to survive
Researchers have identified how a common bacterium is able to manipulate the human immune system during respiratory infections and cause persistent illness.
07/11/2024 09:55 PM
'A history of contact': Geneticists are rewriting the narrative of Neanderthals and other ancient humans
Using genomes from 2,000 living humans as well as three Neanderthals and one Denisovan, an international team mapped the gene flow between the hominin groups over the past quarter-million years.
07/11/2024 09:55 PM
User control of autoplay can alter awareness of online video 'rabbit holes'
A new study suggests that giving users control over the interface feature of autoplay can help them realize that they are going down a rabbit hole. The work has implications for responsibly designing online content viewing platforms and algorithms, as well as helping users better recognize extreme content.
07/11/2024 09:55 PM
Ultrasound technology can be used to boost mindfulness, study finds
In a new study, researchers used low-intensity ultrasound technology to noninvasively alter a brain region associated with activities such as daydreaming, recalling memories and envisioning the future.
07/11/2024 09:55 PM
A stealth fungus has decimated North American bats but scientists may be a step closer to treating white-nose syndrome
An invasive fungus that colonizes the skin of hibernating bats with deadly consequences is a stealthy invader that uses multiple strategies to slip into the small mammals' skin cells and quietly manipulate them to aid its own survival. The fungus, which causes the disease white-nose syndrome, has devastated several North American species over the last 18 years.
07/11/2024 09:55 PM
Living near oil and gas activity linked to poor mental health during preconception
A new study suggests that people who are trying to conceive and live close to oil and gas development sites have a heightened risk of developing adverse mental health outcomes. The study found that people who lived within roughly six miles of active oil and gas development had greater development of moderate-to-severe depressive symptoms, compared to people living 12 to 31 miles away from this activity. High perceived stress was elevated among people living just 1.25 miles away from oil and gas development, and greater intensity of oil and gas production also contributed to high perceived stress.
07/11/2024 09:55 PM
Engineers' probe could help advance treatment for spinal cord disease, injury
Neuroscientists have used a nanosized sensor to record spinal cord neurons in free-moving mice, a feat that could lead to the development of better treatments for spinal cord disease and injury.
07/11/2024 09:55 PM
Muscle machine: How water controls the speed of muscle contraction
The flow of water within a muscle fiber may dictate how quickly muscle can contract, according to a new study.
07/11/2024 09:55 PM
Light-induced Meissner effect
Researchers have developed a new experiment capable of monitoring the magnetic properties of superconductors at very fast speeds.